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Turn white color to transparent for a series of png images
mogrify can be used like convert. The difference is that mogrify overwrites files: http://www.imagemagick.org/www/mogrify.html Of course, other source colors can be used as well.

locating packages held back, such as with "aptitude hold "
locating packages held back, such as with "aptitude hold "

Plaintext credentials sniffing with tcpdump and grep
Simple TCPDUMP grepping for common unsafe protocols (HTTP, POP3, SMTP, FTP)

Clone all repos from a user with lynx
https://wuseman.github.io/wcloner/

Console clock
Turn your terminal into digital clock.

Save a file you edited in vim without the needed permissions
probably just like 1204, but uses tee as a filter (+ I actually understand how this one works)

Debug a remote php application (behind firewall) using ssh tunnel for XDEBUG port 9000
If you need to xdebug a remote php application, which is behind a firewall, and you have an ssh daemon running on that machine. you can redirect port 9000 on that machine over to your local machine from which you run your xdebug client (I am using phpStorm) So, run this command on your local machine and start your local xdebug client, to start debugging. more info: http://code.google.com/p/spectator/wiki/Installing

Run bash on top of a vi session (saved or not saved), run multiple commands, instead of one at a time with :!(bashcommand), type exit and [enter] to get back to where you left off in vi.
Helps when I'm editing a script and want to double check some commands without having to exit out of vi multiple times or having to use another terminal session.

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Wordwrap long text string using "\n"
I used this fragment with Imagemagick convert so that I can place long text strings in pictures. The "\n" gets converted to a true newline in the image. So this fragment uses fold command to wrap the line and then sed to convert newlines (and any trailing spaces on the line) to the text "\n"


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