Commands by knoppix5 (66)

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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

create ext4 filesystem with big count of inodes
XX is your device partition number like /dev/sdc1 . to see how many inodes your partition have type: $ df --inodes (or df -i) Default formatting with ext4 would create small inode count for the new partition if you need big count of inodes is the fstype news the correct one. in debian you can see which fstype exists as template in: $ vim /etc/mke2fs.conf if you format default ext for a partition size with 1TB you would get 1 Million inodes (not enough for backupStorages) but if you format with fstype news you would get hunderd of millions of inodes for the partition. you have tune $/etc/sysctl.conf also with following sysconfig parameters $ fs.file-max = XXX $ fs.nr_open = XXX where XXX is the count of max inodes for whole system

list file descriptors opened by a process
Useful for examining hostile processes (backdoors,proxies)

List all Samba user name

Delete specific remote 'origin' branch 'gh-pages'

Schedule a script or command in x num hours, silently run in the background even if logged out
doesn't require "at", change the "2h" to whatever you want... (deafult unit for sleep is seconds)

Print ASCII Character Chart
Prints out an ascii chart using builtin bash! Then formats using cat -t and column. The best part is: $ echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(( $i/64*100 + $i%64/8*10 + $i%8 ))"; From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/ascii-codes-and-reference.html

copy timestamps of files from one location to another - useful when file contents are already synced but timestamps are wrong.
Sometimes when copying files from one place to another, the timestamps get lost. Maybe you forgot to add a flag to preserve timestamps in your copy command. You're sure the files are exactly the same in both locations, but the timestamps of the files in the new home are wrong and you need them to match the source. Using this command, you will get a shell script (/tmp/retime.sh) than you can move to the new location and just execute - it will change the timestamps on all the files and directories to their previous values. Make sure you're in the right directory when you launch it, otherwise all the touch commands will create new zero-length files with those names. Since find's output includes "." it will also change the timestamp of the current directory. Ideally rsync would be the way to handle this - since it only sends changes by default, there would be relatively little network traffic resulting. But rsync has to read the entire file contents on both sides to be sure no bytes have changed, potentially causing a huge amount of local disk I/O on each side. This could be a problem if your files are large. My approach avoids all the comparison I/O. I've seen comments that rsync with the "--size-only" and "--times" options should do this also, but it didn't seem to do what I wanted in my test. With my approach you can review/edit the output commands before running them, so you can tell exactly what will happen. The "tee" command both displays the output on the screen for your review, AND saves it to the file /tmp/retime.sh. Credit: got this idea from Stone's answer at http://serverfault.com/questions/344731/rsync-copying-over-timestamps-only?rq=1, and combined it into one line.

shell bash iterate number range with for loop

List your largest installed packages (on Debian/Ubuntu)


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